Surprising Yorkshire

francesco By francesco, 22nd Nov 2010 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Travel>Europe>England>Yorkshire

It is only the beginning. Why the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, the largest outdoor sculpture museum in Europe, more surprises out of the ordinary. Not so much (and more) in size and variety of trees and flowers, but for the fine collection of sculptures of modern art

Yorkshire, with Dracula, Cook, and Queen Victoria

The rabbit, placid and majestic in its stillness, watching the transition from the curious who stop at his feet. The young men stare in disbelief and enjoy the original sculpture of intertwined wires. A little further on, under a large gazebo in the shade of linden trees in bloom, a Japanese enjoys stepping rhythmically circling the floor. At every step, the music emanates from the floor and free air.And that's just the beginning. Why the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, the largest outdoor sculpture museum in Europe, more surprises out of the ordinary. Not only in size and variety of trees and flowers, but for the fine collection of modern art sculptures that guards: the majestic anthropomorphic works by Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth, trees decorated with trash cans, plastic chairs and bidet Dennis Oppenheim, the great hieratic rabbits by Sophie Ryder.

In the footsteps of Dracula and Captain Cook

But the park in Wakefield, in this quiet corner of North Yorkshire visited by more than 250 thousand people a year, contains only a piece of the immense green soul of the ancient English county. Hidden in the woods or wide open on the North Sea, stone villages, historic monasteries and modern secular city tell a story, often spiced with anecdotes legendary.
For example, Whitby, North Yorkshire. The charming fishing port at the mouth of the River Esk owes its fame to the book by Bram Stoker, Dracula, inspired leaden atmosphere of the cemetery in the shadow of the Church of St. Mary, on the hill overlooking the town. From there, it is not difficult to imagine the landing of Dracula in the same waters off into unknown lands that saw the explorer James Cook. The two are devoted, respectively, the Captain Cook Memorial Museum (Grape Lane, www.cookmuseumwhitby.co.uk) and The Bram Stoker's Dracula Experience (Marine Parade 9).

The Jewels of the Queen with Fish and Chips

The narrow streets and alleys leading down to the wharf is full of life. To get an overview of Whitby from above, take the 199 steps, from the Abbey of St. Mary, leads to the heart of the city: a blend of ancient buildings, shops smelling of smoked herring, crammed with souvenir shops and local products, such as precious Jet, the black stone used as a jewel from Queen Victoria (later became a fashion must-Victorian)
Cameos, pearls, brooches and rings, all made of the precious fossils of ancient forests and the cliffs of Whitby, are from W. Hamond (112 Church Street, www.whamond.com). And if, by now, it's time for lunch, do not miss the Magpie's Café, recognizable by the long line of customers out the door, where they are needed the most famous (and traditional) fish and chips with cream of peas warm County ( 2 Golden Lion Bank, www.magpiecafe.co.uk).

Leeds, Yorkshire gateway

On the steam train - Thirty miles south, through fields of rapeseed and majestic castles, and you get to Pickering, a village famous for its castle, built on a limestone cliff in the far south of the North York Moors National Park. A rural, untouched, to be enjoyed on board the steam train from Pickering leads, slow and smoky, through the English countryside. The stage, on the obligation, to Helmsley, if only the cuisine (refined, as the ambience of this charming hotel) restaurant at the Black Swan Hotel: Hot smoked salmon with apple sorbet, beef tenderloin on truffle cream, parfait of coconut and spice cake .

Shopping and Night at the Castle

For shopping, head towards Leeds, served by low cost flights. Fountains, flower beds and liberty windows, shops and art galleries you will find numerous. After London, it was the first city where Harvey Nichols opened a store, and its Art Gallery - since 1888 showcase of modern and contemporary British art - has been described by The Times the best after that of the City. And then concentrated to the original stores Kirkgate Market (Rose & Co seems to be a pastry shop, actually sells everything, and the contracts are dolled up like pin-up thirties), a theater (the Grand Theatre, hosted Houdini and Charlie Chaplin)
To sleep, the modern City Inn (www.cityinn.com) offers the best view over the city from the rooftop terrace. But for a night of dreams, the right address is the Hazlewood Castle, a luxury hotel housed in a historic castle, less than an hour from Leeds (Paradise Lane, Hazlewood, www.hazlewood-castle.com). In the vast countryside that surrounds it, was fought one of the bloodiest battles of the Wars of the Roses for the succession to the English throne, torn between Plantagenet, Lancaster and York.

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Comments

author avatar christopheranton
23rd Nov 2010 (#)

I think I would like to see all this for myself.
Those rabbits look freaky.

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author avatar francesco
23rd Nov 2010 (#)

It is very nice - Thank you for your comment

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author avatar Denise O
23rd Nov 2010 (#)

Great article. I woudl love to visit this place.
You've made it so inviting.
Thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar francesco
23rd Nov 2010 (#)

Maybe we go together .. hehehe:)
Thanks for your comment

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author avatar Denise O
23rd Nov 2010 (#)

would*

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author avatar francesco
23rd Nov 2010 (#)

it would be nice?

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