A common spectacle at the religious festival in Pondicherry is fire –walking

madugundurukmini By madugundurukmini, 17th May 2014 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/3zdieg5d/
Posted in Wikinut>Travel>Asia>India>Tamil Nadu

Devotees work themselves into a trance and walk over a bed of burning charcoal without scarring the soles of their feet.

Devotees work themselves into a trance and walk over a bed of burning charcoal without scarring the soles of their feet

Pondicherry belongs to history –at one time an obscure village, later a centre of trade with the Romans, then a place of learning. The sage Agastya is said to have lived and taught here- at the very spot where Sri Aurobind started his world –famous Ashram centuries later.

Pondicherry’s Hindu temples back to an even more distant time. The temple of Sri Thirukameswarar at Villianur, 8 kilometers from the town, was built in the 12th century. The car festival here attracts thousands of pilgrims every year.

More ancient still is the Thiruvandar temple dedicated to Shiva. It dates back to the 7th century and is noted for its fine sculptures.

Right in the town at Rue Orleans is the Makula Vinayaka temple. Friday is a special for this shrine. Hundreds of devotees flock to it from all over the town, believing that the reigning deity favors them with success in all their ventures.

A common spectacle at the religious festival in Pondicherry is fire –walking. Devotees work themselves into a trance and walk over a bed of burning charcoal without scarring the soles of their feet.

Near the main road going Pondicherry to Cuddalore is a tiny village called Bahur. The swift rhythm or the `taalam’ of cymbals and the mridangam breaks into the stillness of the early morning. The rich and powerful noise of the Nadaswaram rises up in the air. With great clanging, the priest in the Mulanadar temple swings the tongue of the big brass bell. And the village starts coming to life.

During the pallava period, this small village was an important town and a seat of learning with a Sanskrit collage. The pallava king Nandivarman married Sankha, a Rashtrakuta princess. As part of her dowry, the princess brought a sculptor whose superb bas relief panels, unusual in style for this area, decorate the façade of the splendid Mulanadar temple.

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Comments

author avatar Randhir Bechoo
17th May 2014 (#)

Interesting page.The firewalking ceremoney is also done in South Africa.Many temples draws a lot of crowds .A lot of dedication and long fast of 18 days is observed in order for devotess to take part.Thanks for your share.

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author avatar Questwriter
21st May 2014 (#)

Thanks for a very enjoyable article.

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